Jules Tremaine

Created by Norvell W. Page Pseudonyms included G. Wayman Jones, N. Wooten Poge, Randolph Craig & Grant Stockbridge (1904-1961) "That grenade must have ruined my guitar. I'll have to buy a new one." Prolific pulpster Norvell W. Page, although he was best known for churning out countless novel-length adventures featuring proto-superhero The Spider for the pulp of the … Continue reading Jules Tremaine

Ed Race (“The Masked Marksman”)

Created by Emile C. Tepperman Pseudonym include John Benton, Anthony Clements, Brant House, Kenneth Robeson, Curtis Steele, Grant Stockbridge, Robert Wallace (1899-1951) ED RACE was licensed as a P.I. in six different states, but mostly regarded his detective work as a mere hobby. He made the bulk of his bread and butter as a juggler and trick shooter … Continue reading Ed Race (“The Masked Marksman”)

Marty Quade

Created by Emile C. Tepperman Pseudonym include John Benton, Anthony Clements, Brant House, Kenneth Robeson, Curtis Steele, Grant Stockbridge, Robert Wallace (1899-1951) Prolific pulpster Emile C. Tepperman (about whom little seems to be known other than that he was born in 1899 and died in 1951), created dozens of crime-fighting series characters for the rough paper magazines, … Continue reading Marty Quade

They Also Served: Norman Saunders

Artist & Illustrator(1907-89)   One of the most successful pulp artists of the century (and BOY! Could he do babes!), NORMAN SAUNDERS moved effortlessly from the pulps to paperback illustration. He was born in Minnesota, and took a mail-order art course, which eventually landed him a job at Fawcett Publications from 1928 to 1934. But he … Continue reading They Also Served: Norman Saunders

Carrie Cashin

Created by Theodore A. Tinsley Other pseudonyms include Reid Sleyton, Maxwell Grant (1894-79) Attractive as sin, hard-boiled as hell. One of the very first of the hardboiled lady dicks of the pulps, and certainly the most popular was Manhattan eye CARRIE CASHIN, who appeared in over three dozen action-packed, fast-paced stories, starting in the November … Continue reading Carrie Cashin

Rod Case

Created by John K. Butler (1908-64) Hoo-boy! They sure had some peculiar occupations, those hard-boiled dicks of the pulps. ROD CASE was--I kid you not!--a hard-nosed "special agent" for the Los Angeles-based General Pacific Telephone Company in a handful of short stories that ran in Black Mask in the early 40's. He was somewhat of … Continue reading Rod Case

Lin Melchan

Created by Warren Lucas Pseudonym of John Kobler (1910-2000) He's usually lumped in with the infamous "defective detectives" of the "weird menace" pulps of the 1930s, but private eye LIN MELCHAN's "affliction" is pretty much the opposite of that of Leon Byrne's deaf detective Dan Holden. Lin was blessed (or was it cursed?) with a … Continue reading Lin Melchan

Miles Standish Rice

Created by Baynard H. Kendrick Pseudonyms include Richard Hayward (1894-1977) Miami-based MILES STANDISH RICE was Baynard Kendrick's other private investigator--you know, the one who wasn't blind. Now completely overshadowed by Captain Duncan Maclain, the sightless insurance investigator of numerous short stories, novels and even film, Rice nonetheless had a good run of his own back in … Continue reading Miles Standish Rice

Calvin Kane

Created by Russell Gray Pseudonym of Bruno Fischer Other pseudonyms include Harrison Storm) (1908-1992) Ladies and gentlemen, step right up and behold the infamous Crab Detective! CALVIN KANE was a pulp-era private eye from the thirties whose "severely deformed body made him look like a refugee from a side-show attraction," according to Don Hutchison, pulp historian. … Continue reading Calvin Kane

Ben Bryn

Created by Russell Gray Pseudonym of Bruno Fischer Other pseudonyms include Harrison Storm (1908-92) A childhood bout with polio left pulp private eye BEN BRYN with a pair of withered and almost useless legs. But that didn't stop the 5'2" gumshoe from developing an extremely powerful upper torso, grim determination and a razor-sharp mind. As … Continue reading Ben Bryn