Trixie Meehan & Mike Harris

Created by T.T. Flynn Pseudonym of (Thomas Theodore Flynn (1902-78) "Pert and sweet, soft and cuddly, harmless as a kitten and luscious-looking to all big strong men—that's Trixie if you don't know her." Nuts about each other, or just nuts? One of those hard-boiled dames from the pulps, cute, gun-toting TRIXIE MEEHAN was, along with her … Continue reading Trixie Meehan & Mike Harris

Daffy Dill

Created by Richard Sale Pseudonyms include Bernard Elas, Seymour Richards, John St. John (1911-93) Nearly every detective pulp worth its salt had some sort of brash, wisecracking reporter lurking among its regulars, sticking his nose into things, and Detective Fiction Weekly was no exception. It had easy-going (but pistol-packing) JOE "DAFFY" DILL of The New York Chronicle, always seemingly … Continue reading Daffy Dill

Jules Tremaine

Created by Norvell W. Page Pseudonyms included G. Wayman Jones, N. Wooten Poge, Randolph Craig & Grant Stockbridge (1904-1961) "That grenade must have ruined my guitar. I'll have to buy a new one." Prolific pulpster Norvell W. Page, although he was best known for churning out countless novel-length adventures featuring proto-superhero The Spider for the pulp of the … Continue reading Jules Tremaine

Ed Race (“The Masked Marksman”)

Created by Emile C. Tepperman Pseudonym include John Benton, Anthony Clements, Brant House, Kenneth Robeson, Curtis Steele, Grant Stockbridge, Robert Wallace (1899-1951) ED RACE was licensed as a P.I. in six different states, but mostly regarded his detective work as a mere hobby. He made the bulk of his bread and butter as a juggler and trick shooter … Continue reading Ed Race (“The Masked Marksman”)

Marty Quade

Created by Emile C. Tepperman Pseudonym include John Benton, Anthony Clements, Brant House, Kenneth Robeson, Curtis Steele, Grant Stockbridge, Robert Wallace (1899-1951) Prolific pulpster Emile C. Tepperman (about whom little seems to be known other than that he was born in 1899 and died in 1951), created dozens of crime-fighting series characters for the rough paper magazines, … Continue reading Marty Quade

You’re a Mean Man with a Typewriter, Sister

The Hard-boiled Lady Writers of the Pulps The story goes that when big shot Hollywood director Howard Hawks finished reading Leigh Brackett's 1944 crime novel No Good From a Corpse, he was blown away by the snappy patter and the rock hard prose, and figured the writer might be just who he needed for his … Continue reading You’re a Mean Man with a Typewriter, Sister

They Also Served: Norman Saunders

Artist & Illustrator(1907-89)   One of the most successful pulp artists of the century (and BOY! Could he do babes!), NORMAN SAUNDERS moved effortlessly from the pulps to paperback illustration. He was born in Minnesota, and took a mail-order art course, which eventually landed him a job at Fawcett Publications from 1928 to 1934. But he … Continue reading They Also Served: Norman Saunders

They Also Served: Richard Lillis

Artist & Illustrator (1899-94)   One of the earlier pulp artists (he was young enough to serve in the first World War), RICHARD LILLIS was born in 1899 in Oxford, New York, the son of dairy farmers who ran a small grocery store on their property. He managed to attend an upstate New York college for … Continue reading They Also Served: Richard Lillis

They Also Served: H.J. Ward

Artist & Illustrator (1909-45)    Despite his short life (he died of lung cancer at the age of 35), HUGH JOSEPH WARD cut a wide swath, responsible for some off the most sensational and iconic pulp mag covers of all time, working for Munsey, Dell and Popular, but mostly for Culture Publication's notorious Spicy line--which … Continue reading They Also Served: H.J. Ward

Dare to Judge This Book

Some Great Pulp & Paperback Cover Artists "... the covers were sometimes printed in advance, before there was a story. So what the editor did was show me the cover or a drawing - it was usually a picture of a half-naked woman and someone stripping the rest of her clothes off her. And on … Continue reading Dare to Judge This Book