My Scrapbook: Original Pressbook for Manhandled

My Scrapbook Original Pressbook for Manhandled (1949, Paramount Pictures) If you're not familiar with the 1949 film noir Manhandled, it's about time you checked it out. The 1949 film noir is no lost classic, despite a decent cast (Dorothy Lamour, Sterling Hayden, etc.), but Dan Duryea, as private detective Karl Benson, is an absolute joy to … Continue reading My Scrapbook: Original Pressbook for Manhandled

Karl Benson (Manhandled)

Created by L.S. Goldsmith “You’re not talking to a cluck Charlie. You’re talking to a guy who knows all the angles.” Dan Duryea plays gum-popping KARL BENSON, a crooked ex-cop reduced to doing repo jobs, divorce frame-ups and assorted other sordid sidelines in Lewis Foster's preposterous but entertaining 1949 noir, Manhandled. The flick does have … Continue reading Karl Benson (Manhandled)

Albert Arnett (Born to Kill)

Created by James Gunn Pseudonym of John Darcy Cannon (1920-66) "It's quite all right, Mrs. Brent. I am a man of integrity, but I'm always willing to listen to an interesting offer." -- Arnett maskes his pitch to Helen in Born to Kill The 1947 noir classic Born to Kill from RKO is not a … Continue reading Albert Arnett (Born to Kill)

Brendan Frye (Brick)

Created by Rian Johnson "The ape blows or I clam." Much like The Big Lebowski, Rian Johnson's Brick (2005) is a P.I. film that has everything you'd want in a P.I. film -- except a P.I. And like the Coen Brother's Dude,  Brick's BRENDAN FRYE (in an amazing performance by Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is a loose cannon, … Continue reading Brendan Frye (Brick)

Mel Samson (Too Late)

Created by Dennis Huack "I need to change my life." -- Mel Samson MEL SAMSON is the hapless L.A. private eye centrepiece in Too Late, a twisted little bit of cinematic chess perpetrated by writer/director Dennis Hauck that plays with all your favourite P.I. and noir tropes (circa 2016) in all-new ways, thanks to a … Continue reading Mel Samson (Too Late)

Harry Moseby (Night Moves)

Created by Alan Sharp "Ain't it funny how the night moves/When you just don't seem to have that much to lose? Ain't it funny how the night moves/With autumn closing in?" -- "Night Moves" by Bob Seger* One of the great private eye flicks of all time, Night Moves (1975, Warner Brothers) is too often … Continue reading Harry Moseby (Night Moves)

Tim “T.M.” Slade

Created by Raoul Whitfield "Sure." -- Slade's reply to almost everything. In High Tide, a rarely seen but highly recommended little 1947 B noir from Monogram, Lee Tracy plays gruff, crusading Los Angeles tabloid newspaper editor Hugh Fresney and Don Castle plays TIM "T.M." SLADE, a former reporter who's become a private eye. When Fresney, … Continue reading Tim “T.M.” Slade

Al Hickey & Frank Boggs (Hickey & Boggs)

Created by Walter Hill At the time, circa 1998, my original entry on this much loved but definitely bleak cult film had a lot of fun suggesting it was rarely shown because it might contradict Bill Cosby's squeaky clean image as America's favourite TV dad. That was such a long time ago... Actors Robert Culp … Continue reading Al Hickey & Frank Boggs (Hickey & Boggs)

The Neo-Noirs

Noir in the Nineties (Sometimes the Eyes Don't Have It) The private eye film seems to be an increasingly rare animal, but the nineties saw a major rebirth of the crime film. Some of these were small, cash-in-the-empties indie productions, barely appearing in theatres before rushing to video or cable, and others were big budget … Continue reading The Neo-Noirs

My Scrapbook: The Greatest Movie Poster of All Time?

My Scrapbook The Greatest Movie Poster of All Time? If you're a regular visitor to this site, and you haven't seen Chinatown, what the hell are you doing here? Leave this site immediately, and go watch this classic from 1974. You can thank me later. Of course, for those of you still here, I'm sure … Continue reading My Scrapbook: The Greatest Movie Poster of All Time?