Thomas B. Dewey

Pseudonyms include Tom Brandt and Cord Wainer (1915-81) This bio, taken from Brian Ritt's excellent Paperback Confidential, highlights the career of one of the true pioneers of the genre--Thomas B. Dewey, a man who bridged the gap between the Hammett/Chandler model and the more socially aware and compassionate eyes that followed, such as Lew Archer, … Continue reading Thomas B. Dewey

You’re a Mean Man with a Typewriter, Sister

The Hard-boiled Lady Writers of the Pulps The story goes that when big shot Hollywood director Howard Hawks finished reading Leigh Brackett's 1944 crime novel No Good From a Corpse, he was blown away by the snappy patter and the rock hard prose, and figured the writer might be just who he needed for his … Continue reading You’re a Mean Man with a Typewriter, Sister

The Hammer

Winners of The PWA Hammer Award The Hammer, first presented in 2007, goes to the character, not the author, for his/her contribution to, and longevity in the field. It's named after Mike Hammer, of course, who certainly made his mark, and so far, thanks to Max Allan Collins, has shown no sign of leaving... 2007 … Continue reading The Hammer

The Eye (The PWA Lifetime Achievement Award)

Winners of The PWA Lifetime Achievement Award The Eye, the Private Eye Writers of America's Lifetime Achievement award, was first presented in 1982. It isn't given out every year, but then again, they don't just bestow it on anyone... 1982Ross Macdonald 1983Mickey Spillane 1984William Campbell Gault 1985Howard Browne 1986Richard S. Prather 1987Bill Pronzini 1988Dennis Lynds, … Continue reading The Eye (The PWA Lifetime Achievement Award)

David Dodge

(1910-1974) David Dodge was born in Berkeley, California. His career as a writer began when he made a bet with his wife Elva that he could write a better mystery novel than the one she was reading. He drew on his professional experience as a Certified Public Accountant to create his first series character, San … Continue reading David Dodge

Day Keene

Pseudonym of Gunnar Hjerstedt Other pseudonyms include Lewis Dixon, Alvin F. Hunter, William Richards, Clark Nelson, Daniel White, John Corbett & Donald King (1904-1969) "Keene is a natural storyteller; he keeps things moving right along, and no reader is likely to bored." -- Bill Crider in 1001 Midnights "Even in his minor books, you can see … Continue reading Day Keene

Some Things About Howard Browne

Pseudonyms include John Evans, Alexander Blade, William Brengle, Lawrence Chandler, Ivar Jorgensen, Alexander Blade, Jack Lait, Lee Mortimer, John Pollard, Mickey Spillane and Lee Francis (1907-1999)  One possible reason HOWARD BROWNE is given such short shrift these days is that he was just too darn good at too many things at once. Some remember him as a … Continue reading Some Things About Howard Browne

Robert Leslie Bellem

Pseudonyms include John Archer, Reeves L. Black, Walter Bronson, Walt Bruce, Ellery Watson Calder, Harley L. Court, Rex Daly, John Grange, Allan Henry, Fred Horton, Jerome Hyams, Nelson Kent, Richard Lyle, Lee Martin, James W. Marvin, Hugh McKnight, R. L. Morris, Kenneth A. Nelson, Jerome Severs Perry, Ben Proctor, Frank Roberts, John A. Saxon, L. N. Snyder, Richard Lathrop Steed, Hamilton Washburn, L. W. Watson, Perry … Continue reading Robert Leslie Bellem

Frank Gruber

Pseudonyms include Stephen Acre, Charles K. Boston & John K. Vedder (1904-1969) One of the most successful of the pulp writers, Frank Gruber was born February 2, 1904, in Elmer, Minnesota and died December 9, 1969 in Santa Monica, California. But in those sixty-five years, Gruber became one of the most prolific writers of pulp … Continue reading Frank Gruber

Roger Torrey

Pseudonyms: Sam Drake, Samuel Drake, John Ryan, R.D. Torrey (1901-46)   Most readers of private detective fiction have probably never heard of pulp writer ROGER TORREY.  It‘s understandable, I guess. He wrote only one novel, 42 Days of Murder, and almost everything else he ever wrote has never been reprinted. And yet, over a relatively … Continue reading Roger Torrey