“No Chance in Hell” by Nick Quarry

A Review by August West Marvin H. Albert used his Nick Quarry pseudonym for all six of his Jake Barrow private eye novels. We're not breaking new ground here, but all the novels have hair-trigger action and are excellent. And No Chance in Hell, published in 1960, is one of the best from the series. It starts … Continue reading “No Chance in Hell” by Nick Quarry

“Apologia Pro Vita Sua”

By Rex Stout The following poem, written by Rex Stout, appeared in the August 21, 1935 issue of The New York Times, in conjunction with the then-recent publication of his second Nero Wolfe mystery. At the time, Stout was still relatively unknown, and must have been feeling a little sensitive about being pegged as a mere … Continue reading “Apologia Pro Vita Sua”

Forgotten Hammett: A Long Lost Interview

House Burglary Poor Trade By Helen Herbert Foster Fall-Winter 1929, The Brooklyn Eagle Magazine Of all the men embezzling from their employers with whom I have had contact, I can't remember a dozen who smoked, drank or had any of the vices in which bonding companies are so interested. Nor have I have ever known … Continue reading Forgotten Hammett: A Long Lost Interview

“It’s Not Supposed to Matter”

"The Conversation" Remembered You can't fit The Conversation into any neat, cinematic genre convention. It's a bleak, cynical character study within a psychological thriller. It's also an inside-out twist on the traditional hard-boiled P.I. as Round Table knight. Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) is no gumshoe. He's a surveillance expert. A legendary eavesdropper considered tops in … Continue reading “It’s Not Supposed to Matter”

Looking for the Connections

Reconsidering Altman's "The Long Goodbye" I think Altman's rendition of The Long Goodbye gets a bad rap. Fans of Raymond Chandler's poetic novels and Bogart's iconic portrayal find Elliot Gould as a smart-ass, sleepy "Rip Van Marlowe" too much of a change in character. Gould's Philip Marlowe is a man who fell asleep in the … Continue reading Looking for the Connections

You Can’t Keep a Good Gal Down

An Interview with Gloria Fickling, the Real Honey West   “Honey West here.” That’s how Gloria Fickling answered her phone when I reached her in her study in “beautiful” Laguna Beach Gloria, for those of you who don’t know, is Gloria Fickling, the female half of G.G. Fickling, the husband-and-wife team (her “sweet darling” husband, … Continue reading You Can’t Keep a Good Gal Down

The Adventures of Cardigan: A Review

Review by Mario Taboada "Hardesty was as dumb an egg as they come -- but boy how that baby could pitch ball. So when he tangled himself all up in a murder net it was up to that big dick from Cosmos to pick the knots. Or else - But there just wasn't any "or else". … Continue reading The Adventures of Cardigan: A Review

Hard, Tough and More Than a Little Nasty

Martin Brett's Mike Garfin Novels An Overview by Kevin Burton Smith For a homesick Montréaler like me, Stark House's 2006 reprinting of The Deadly Dames (originally published in 1956) and A Dum-Dum for the President (1961), the third and fourth books to feature ma ville's greatest private eye, Martin Brett's Michel "Mike" Garfin, provides an embarrassment … Continue reading Hard, Tough and More Than a Little Nasty

True Detectives

Famous--or Infamous--Real-Life Eyes   Strange but true! The private eye existed in fiction before he (or she) ever existed in real life! Still, these are a few of the real-life eyes you may have heard of. They weren't all saints, mind you, and more than a few of them may have padded their CVs... François … Continue reading True Detectives

The Mitch Tobin Series by Tucker Coe (Donald Westlake)

An Overview by Bryan Schingle I am not a huge fan of the books of Donald E. Westlake. But I love the books written by his pseudonyms. I was already an avid fan of the extremely bleak, hard-boiled Parker books that Westlake wrote under the pen name of Richard Stark, featuring a hardened professional criminal. The characters, … Continue reading The Mitch Tobin Series by Tucker Coe (Donald Westlake)