Sexton Blake

Created by Harry Blyth
Pseudonym of Hal Meredeth
(and a cast of thousands)

Created by Harry Blyth (under the pen name of Hal Meredeth) in 1893—six years after Sherlock Holmes first appeared in print—SEXTON BLAKE on to appear in over 4,000 stories, written told by a couple of hundred different writers, including John Creasey, Michael Moorcock, Gilbert Chester, John Creasey and Berkely Grey, creator of Norman Conquest.

Blake was called the “prince of the penny dreadfuls” and “the office boys’ Sherlock Holmes.” He first popped up in The Halfpenny Marvel, shortly after a certain Mr. Holmes toppled off Reichenbach Falls, and was often even more Sherlock than Sherlock. He even lived — surprise, surprise! — on Baker Street in London.

Oddly, though, this most British of heroes was initially called Frank Blake. Whoever thought of changing “Frank” to “Sexton” is not known, but I hope he at least got a pat on the back. Blyth himself received only nine guineas for the first story, signing away all his rights to the character, but stuck around to write about half a dozen more stories before other pens — rarely credited — took over.

The latter’s demise caused the first break in his otherwise unbroken run; the only year since his Edwardian-era genesis in which not a single Blake tale saw the light of day.

The stories took definite form about 1905 and were marketed aggressively by early press baron Lord Northcliff’s Amalgamated Press though his various weekly magazines. Though Northcliffe rose to being a power in the world, much of his fortune was due to the pennies and half pennies plunked down on newsagents’ counters every week for the story papers and comics that carried, among others, the exploits of Sexton Blake.

His adventures first appeared in magazines such as Union Jack, Boys’ Friend and Detective Weekly, from 1893 to 1940; and starting in 1915, he had his very own magazine, The Sexton Blake Library, which launched in 1915 and ran, amazingly enough, until 1963. He also appeared in comic strip adventures in Knockout Comic from 1939 to 1960,

And, as the stories continued to spew out, Blake soon outgrew his influences. He gave up the spiffy bicycle he dashed about in, and acquired a Rolls. Although definitely a detective, Sexton preferred fighting mysterious cowled villains, complete with long barrelled Brownings and homes in ruined abbeys, very much in the Edgar Wallace tradition. The endless stories were always stronger on action rather than deduction.

Throughout, he was assisted by his faithful manservant, the allegedly street-smart Tinker Bell, an early Archie Goodwin type rather than a knock-off  Watson. He could also count on the sometime-assistance on his landlady, Mrs. Bardell, and his loyal but — to me at least — totally unnecessary and irrelevant bloodhound, Pedro.

But whatever action was required, Sexton was up for it. He drove his Rolls at a blazing fast 20 mph rather than say “follow that hansom” and was more than capable of flying a plane. His adventures took him not just all over England, but to Canada, the Alps, Papua New Guinea, Siberia, the Congo, Spain, the Gobi Desert, where he tangled with man-eating plants, mad scientists and other larger-than-life villains, including Miss Death, Prince Memes and Dr. Cagliostro. This was rip-snorting stuff, and while most pure pulp, heavy on escapism and low on logic or even readibility, a handful were actually quite good.

By the 1930s, Blakemania had spread throughout the Commonwealth, his adventures appearing regularly in the Sexton Blake Weekly, the Union Jack and the Detective Weekly (“Starring Sexton Blake”), with over two hundred writers contributing to the canon, including Peter Cheyney, Gwyn Evans and Gordon Shaw.

There were even, it seems, a few films in the 20s and 30s, though no one I know has ever. admitted to ever having seen one.

Post-WWII, there was a new Blake. In 1956, Bill Howard Baker took over as editor of the Sexton Blake Weekly and heaved the tall, dark, slightly humourless manhunter out of the Golden Age and threw him into the Nuclear one, with shades of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett. The cowled villains were out, the mean streets in. Blake now ran an international detective agency out of Berkely Square (the same London though), acquired a svelte secretary (Paula Dane) and was altogether less old world, more suave and more ruthless. There was still no sex, though the girls were more knowledgeable and there were the politest of hints about Paula Dane. Tinker Bell had next to no role, barring gushing “how wonderful” in the closing scene and fortunately Pedro ceased to exist.

There were some secret-agent-James-Bond style stories generally set in the war but by and large, the atmosphere was seedier, the girls a little flashier and the villains less romantic and more hard bitten. This phase continued into the mid-sixties.

Strangely enough, these were the first Blake stories I read. Some of them were pretty good and I suppose they have a sort of Golden Age appeal to me and perhaps others. There are a number of books carrying collections from the earlier Golden Age but as far as I know none for the post-WWII period.

Blake petered out in the late sixties, although another revival was briefly attempted. Sex was now permitted — at least among the villains and occasionally among clients — and girls giggled more often than seemed necessary. Of course, Sexton Blake and Ms. Dane remained immaculate and serene. This version does not seem to have done well and the few stories I have read were tawdry. Sexton Blake took final retirement in the late 1970s, after a reign of some eighty years.

One thing remained common in all the versions. They remained solely action stories (which is not a bad thing in itself) and Blake never developed any significant personality traits, other than standard master detective/super-hero affectations. Tinker did in a few, but Blake never had anything you could like or dislike or just recognise. This, I dare say, is common enough in pulp fiction.

If intellectual justification is what you need, there is always Dorothy L. Sayers. She wrote that the “significance (of the Sexton Blake stories) in popular literature would richly repay scientific investigation.” And if scientific investigation of pulp is not quite your scene, you may remember that the editors believed in quantity, and let quality take care of itself. It’s true, and a happy accident, that sometimes pretty good quality slipped through and, a great deal of the time, there was at least lights, action, drama.

FURTHERMORE…

Sexton Blake had a long life beyond the world of the printed word. He appeared on stage, screen, television, radio and even comics. The stories, with their serialized feel and non-stop action transferred well to most media.

And apparently you can’t keep a good dick down. In 2020, Rebellion Publishing is bringing Blake back in a big way, with an ambitious series of spiffy collections, curated by Mark Hodder, beginning with the publication in April 2020 with Sexton Blake and the Great War, featuring three stories from the First World War and the lead up to it: The Case Of The Naval Manoeuvres by Norman Goddard (1908), On War Service by Cecil Hayter (1916) and Private Tinker by William Murray Graydon (1915).

“After being largely forgotten for decades, this major new collection heralds a triumphant return for the much-loved detective that not only celebrates Blake, but also serves as the perfect introduction to the charismatic detective for a whole new generation of readers,” said Rebellion. “We’re delighted to be bringing the greatest of all fictional detectives back for modern readers. Sexton Blake was one of the biggest popular characters of his day, starring in endless stories, radio serials, TV series and movies. We’re looking forward to putting the all-action detective back where he belongs—in the hands of readers.”

STORIES, NOVELLAS, NOVELETTES & NOVELS (Incomplete)

  • The Affair of the Demobilized Soldier (1919; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Bungalow Tragedy (1919; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Clue of the Charred Diary (1919; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Fourth Theory (1919; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Boy Without a Memory (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • Daylight Robbery (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Hidden Menace! (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Island Mystery (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Matador’s Fortune (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Mystery of the “Agony” Advert (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Mystery of the Grey Car (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Problem of the Derby Favorite (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Riddle of Riverdale (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Stolen Partnership Papers (1919; by John William Bobin)
  • The Masquerader (1919; by Robert Murray Graydon)
  • The Case of the Man in Motley (1919; by George N. Philips)
  • The Case of the Bogus Ingots (1920; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Home of His Children (1920; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Lincoln’s Inn Tragedy (1920; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Marble Arch Mystery (1920; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Twist in the Trail (1920; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Great Diamond Bluff (1920; by John William Bobin)
  • His Son’s Honour (1920; by John William Bobin)
  • Link by Link (1920; by John William Bobin)
  • The Only Son (1920; by John William Bobin)
  • Out of the Reach of the Law (1920; by John William Bobin)
  • Twice Wronged (1920; by John William Bobin)
  • The Affair of the Blackfriars Financier (1920; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • The Avenging Seven (1920; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • The Doctor’s Double (1921; by E. W. Alais)
  • In the Shadow of Night (1922; by E. W. Alais)
  • The Cornish Coast Mystery (1941; by Delano Ames)
  • The Episode of the Stolen Voice (1921; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Leopard Man (1921; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Man Who Forgot (1921; by R. C. Armour)
  • Terror Island; or, The House of Glass (1921; by R. C. Armour)
  • Through Fire and Water (1921; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Affair of the Family Diamonds (1921; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Architect’s Secret (1921; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Deserted Wife (1921; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Double Tangle (1921; by William J. Bayfield)
  • False Scents (1921; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Island Trader (1921; by John William Bobin)
  • Payment Suspended (1921; by John William Bobin)
  • The Wonder Man’s Challenge (1921; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Gnat (1921; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • Prince Pretence (1921; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Baboon’s Paw (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • By the Skin of His Teeth (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Diamond Flood (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Lighthouse Mystery (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Mystery of the Sunken Road (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Studio Mystery (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Werewolf of Elphinstone (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The White Refugees (1922; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Vanished Husband (1922; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Mystery of the Missing Journalist (1922; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Bogus Laird (1922; by John William Bobin)
  • The Case of the Cultured Pearls (1922; by John William Bobin)
  • The Case of the Trade Secret (1922; by John William Bobin)
  • The Hooded Riders (1922; by John William Bobin)
  • In the Grip of the Tong (1922; by John William Bobin)
  • On the Bed of the Ocean (1922; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • Fingerprints of Fate (1922; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • The House of Ghosts (1922; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • The Case of the Island Princess (1923; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Mysterious Germs (1923; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Desert Trail (1923; by R. C. Armour)
  • In Savage Hayti (1923; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Secret of the Lagoon (1923; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Sun God (1923; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Affair of the Seven Mummy Cases (1923; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the “Wizard” Jockey (1923; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Doctor’s Secret (1923; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Last Clue (1923; by William J. Bayfield)
  • A Legacy of Vengeance (1923; by John William Bobin)
  • The Mystery Mandarin (1923; by John William Bobin)
  • The Green Eyes (1923; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The House at Waterloo (1923; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Mystery of Glyn Castle (1923; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • The Secret of Thurlston Towers (1923; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • The Adventure of the Oil Pirates (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Eccentric Will (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Kidnapped Legatee (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Millionaire Newspaper Owner (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • Certified Insane (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Platinum Smugglers (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Trail of the Tiger (1924; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Income-Tax Frauds (1924; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Millionaire’s Blackmail (1924; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Farrowshot Park Affair (1924; by William J. Bayfield)
  • Flat No. 4 (1924; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Old Tollgate Mystery (1924; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Strange Case of Habberton’s Mile (1924; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Head Dispenser (1924; by John William Bobin)
  • The Boarding-House Mystery (1924; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Brixham Manor Mystery (1924; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Case of the Sleeping Partner (1924; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Human Bloodhound (1924; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Mystery of Rodney’s Cove (1924; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Adventure of the Egyptian Student (1925; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Clue of the Cloakroom Ticket (1925; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Case of the Deported Aliens (1925; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Press Photographer (1925; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Crumblerock Crime (1925; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Mystery of the Pot-Bank (1925; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Secret of the Mansions (1925; by William J. Bayfield)
  • In the Night Watch (1925; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Adventure of the Silk Smugglers (1926; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Affair of the Trade Rivals (1926; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Mystery of Bullen Point (1926; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Riddle of the Lost Emigrant (1926; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Secret of Torre Island (1926; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Treasure of the Manchus (1926; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Adventure of the Red-Headed Man (1926; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Council of Crooks (1926; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Crook’s Double (1926; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Death Duty Swindle (1926; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Mystery of Hanging Sword Alley (1926; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Mystery of the Seaside Hotel (1926; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Case of the Bookmaker Baronet (1926; by John William Bobin)
  • The Case of the Long-Firm Frauds (1926; by John William Bobin)
  • The Impersonators (1926; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Riddle of the Lascar’s Head (1926; by Leonard Harold Brooks)
  • Dead Man’s Shoes (1927; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Movie Mystery (1927; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Pirates of the Air Way (1927; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Prisoner of Buddha (1927; by R. C. Armour)
  • All Suspected (1927; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The City of Horrors (1927; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Oath of Fear (1927; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Secret of the Tomb (1927; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Trail of the Old Lag (1927; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Phantom of the Mill (1927; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Fatal Pit (1927; by John William Bobin)
  • The Tour of Terror (1927; by John William Bobin)
  • The Affair of the Crook Explorer (1928; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Mystery of the Isle of Fortune (1928; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Mystery of the Masked Surgeon (1928; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Trail of Doom (1928; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Adventure of the Man “On Bail” (1928; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The “Flying Squad” Tragedy (1928; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Riddle of the Million Pound Bet (1928; by William J. Bayfield)
  • Down and Out (1928; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Trail of the Poison Gang (1928; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Monomark Mystery (1928; by Lewis Carlton)
  • The Mystery of the Mandarin’s Idol (1928; by Robert Murray Graydon)
  • The Blackpool Mystery (1929; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Affair of the Atlantic Mail Robbery (1929; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Bootlegger’s Victim (1929; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Riddle of the Dead Man’s Pit (1929; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Riddle of the Great Art Exhibition (1929; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Secret of the Cask (1929; by R. C. Armour)
  • The “Black Maria” Mystery (1929; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Covent Garden Mystery (1929; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Death of Duboyne (1929; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Masked Forgers (1929; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Mint Mystery (1929; by William J. Bayfield)
  • Crooks Ltd. (1929; by Lester Bidston)
  • Prisoners of the Desert (1929; by Stacey Blake)
  • The Great “Tote” Fraud (1929; by John William Bobin)
  • The Secret of the Surgery (1929; by John William Bobin)
  • The Masked Raiders (1930; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Masked Dancer (1930; by William J. Bayfield)
  • The Mystery of Oldham (1930; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Case of the Crook Banker (1930; by Ladbroke Black)
  • The Informer (1930; by Ladbroke Black)
  • The Law Courts Mystery (1930; by Allan Blair)
  • The Lombard Street Mystery (1930; by Allan Blair)
  • The Murder of Constable Cartwright (1930; by Allan Blair)
  • The Mystery of the Monument (1930; by Allan Blair)
  • The City of Crooks (1930; by Stacey Blake)
  • The Gang’s Deserter (1930; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Trapper’s Victim (1930; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Masked Marauder (1930; by Robert Murray Graydon)
  • The Great Shipyard Mystery (1931; by John Ascott)
  • The Fatal Alibi (1931; by Lester Bidston)
  • Gang’s Prisoners (1931; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Silent Syndicate (1931; by Lester Bidston)
  • Exhumed! (1931; by Allan Blair)
  • The Fatal Wager (1931; by Allan Blair)
  • The Great Tunnel Mystery (1931; by Allan Blair)
  • The Kidnapped Witness (1931; by Allan Blair)
  • The Death House (1931; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Murder of Munsden (1931; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Secret of the Sanatorium (1931; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Cup Final Crime (1932; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Mill of Fear (1932; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Lincoln’s Inn Tragedy (1932; by Allan Blair)
  • The Policeboat Mystery (1932; by Allan Blair)
  • The Town Hall Crime (1932; by Allan Blair)
  • The Waiting Room Mystery (1932; by Allan Blair)
  • The Fatal Talisman (1932; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • Murder in the Air (1932; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Trafalgar Square Mystery (1932; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Night Safe Mystery (1932; by Lewis Carlton)
  • The Motor Coach Murder (1933; by Lester Bidston)
  • The Arterial Road Murder (1933; by Allan Blair)
  • The Great Turf Fraud (1933; by Allan Blair)
  • The Lord Mayor’s Show Mystery (1933; by Allan Blair)
  • The Man from Dublin (1933; by Allan Blair)
  • On Ticket of Leave (1933; by Stacey Blake)
  • The Survivor’s Secret (1933; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Taxi-Cab Murder (1933; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Tragedy of the West End Actress (1933; by John G. Brandon)
  • Dead Man’s Peak (1933; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • Dr. Ferraro’s Frame-Up (1933; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Mystery of the Tramp Steamer (1933; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Secret of the Loch (1933; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Black Dagger (1933; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Case of the Stranded Touring Company (1933; by Lewis Carlton)
  • The Blazing Garage Crime (1934; by Allan Blair)
  • The Crime at the Seaside Hotel (1934; by Allan Blair)
  • The Case of the Gangster’s Moll (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Championship Crime (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Chink’s Victim (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Glass Dagger (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • Murder on the Stage (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of Three Cities (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • On the Midnight Beat (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • Under Police Protection (1934; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Secret Temple (1934; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Nursing Home Crime (1935; by Coutts Brisbane)
    The Secret of the Gold Locket (1935; by R. C. Armour)
  • The Bathing Pool Mystery (1935; by Allan Blair)
  • The Case of the Crook Councilor (1935; by Allan Blair)
  • The Case of the Murdered Taxi Driver (1935; by Allan Blair)
  • The Mystery of Becher’s Brook (1935; by Allan Blair)
  • The Secret Inquest (1935; by Allan Blair)
  • By Order of the Tong (1935; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Case of the Murdered Commissionaire (1935; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Downing Street Discovery (1935; by John G. Brandon)
  • Murder in Y Division (1935; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Red Boomerang (1935; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Yellow Mask (1935; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Crime on the Moor (1935; by T. C. Bridges)
  • The Secret of the Glen (1935; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Crime at the Quay (1936; by Allan Blair)
  • The Man with the Glaring Eyes (1936; by Allan Blair)
  • The Old Bailey Mystery (1936; by Allan Blair)
  • The Case of the Night Club Queen (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • Dead Man’s Evidence (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Girl Who Knew Too Much (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • Murder on the Fourth Floor (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Murdered Blonde (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Three Acrobats (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Victim of the Thieves’ Den (1936; by John G. Brandon)
  • Blind Man’s Secret (1936; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Case of the Three Absconding Swindlers (1936; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Crime of Gunga Dass (1936; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Secret of the Balkan Heiress (1936; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Trail of the White Turban (1936; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Case of the Blackmailed Banker (1937; by Allan Blair)
  • The Riddle of Five Needle Creek (1937; by Allan Blair)
  • The Devil’s Own (1937; by Gerald Bowman)
  • The Bond Street Raiders (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Crime in the Kiosk (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Diamonds of Ti Ling (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Man from Italy (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Melbourne Mystery (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Murdered Sentry (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of X20 (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Spy from Spain (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Tattooed Triangle (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Victim of the Secret Service (1937; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Masked Man of the Desert (1937; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Midnight Lorry Crime (1937; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Clue of the Tattooed Man (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • Crooks Convoy (1938; by Allan Blair)
  • The Mystery of the Missing Constable (1938; by Allan Blair)
  • The False Alibi (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • Murder on the High Seas (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Dead Man’s Wallet (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Ice Cream Man (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Street Musician (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Pigeon Loft Crime (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Road-House Mystery (1938; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Missing Doctor (1938; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Case of the Kidnapped Prisoner (1939; by Allan Blair)
  • The Case of the Stolen Police Dossier (1939; by Allan Blair)
  • Fatal Forgery (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Great Taxi-Cab Ramp (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Gunboat Mystery (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • In the Hands of Spies (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Man from Singapore (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Man with Jitters (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • Murder on the Ice Rink (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Green Bottle (1939; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Flaming Frontier (1939; by John Brearley)
  • They Came to Spy (1939; by John Brearley)
  • The Riddle of the Negro’s Head (1939; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • The Case of the Dictator’s Double (1940; by Allan Blair)
  • The Mystery Militiaman (1940; by Ladbroke Black)
  • The Black Swastika (1940; by John G. Brandon)
  • Crook’s Cargo (1940; by John G. Brandon)
  • On Ticket of Leave (1940; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Riddle of the Dead Man’s Bay (1940; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Riddle of the Greek Financier (1940; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Terror of the Pacific (1940; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Mystery of the Red Tower (1940; by Coutts Brisbane)
  • Under Secret Orders (1941; by John G. Brandon)
  • The Riddle of the Body on the Road (1941; by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • The Case of John Muir of Merchant Navy (1942; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Missing Stoker (1942; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the “Suspect” Watchmaker (1943; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Biscay Pirate (1944; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Five Fugitives (1944; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Riddle of the Ruins (1944; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Five Red Herrings (1945; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Man from Arnheim (1945; by Lewis Jackson)
  • On Compassionate Leave (1945; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Riddle of the Workman Squire (1945; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Tallyman’s Fate (1945; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Fatal Souvenir (1946; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Night Lorry Driver (1946; by Lewis Jackson)
  • Down East (1946; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Tenant of No. 13 (1946; by Lewis Jackson)
    The Woman with a “Record” (1946; by Lewis Jackson)
  • According to Plan (1947; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Fighting Padre (1947; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Crime on the Cliff (1947; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Night of the 23rd (1947; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Riddle of the Film Star’s Jewels (1947; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Doped Heavyweight (1948; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Man Who Went Wrong (1948; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Case of the Discharged Policeman (1949; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Death of Miss Preedy (May 1949, The Sexton Blake Library; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Man Who Left Home (1949; by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Man from Persia (1951; by Lewis Jackson)
  • “Sexton Blake’s Secret” (by Lewis Jackson)
  • The Riddle of the Blazing Bungalow (1951; by Stephen Blakesley)
  • The Man with a Number (1952; by Stephen Blakesley)
  • The Trail of Raider No. 1 (1952; by Stephen Blakesley)
  • Calling Whitehall 1212 (1952; by Hugh Clevely)
  • The Case of the Smuggled Currency (1953; by Hugh Clevely)
  • The Girl from Toronto (1953; by Hugh Clevely)
  • The Night Club Mystery (1953; by Hugh Clevely)
  • The Case of the Criminal’s Daughter (1954)
  • The Case of the Three Survivors (1954)
  • The Crime at 3 A.M. (1954)
  • The Heir of Tower House (1954)
  • The Man Who Knew Too Much (1955; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Without Warning (1955; by W. Howard Baker)
  • The Case of the Legion Deserter (1955)
  • The House of Evil (1955)
  • The Strange Affair of the Widow’s Diamonds (1955)
  • Battle Song (1956; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Dark Mambo (1956; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Devil’s Can-Can (1956; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Frightened Lady (1956; by W. Howard Baker)
  • It Happened in Hamburg (1956; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Requiem for Redheads (1956; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Murder with Variety (1957; by William Arthur)
  • Shoot When Ready (1957; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Walk in Fear (1957; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Corpse to Copenhagen (1957; by Jonathan Burke)
  • Appointment with Danger (1958; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Crime Is My Business (1958; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Crime on My Mind (1958; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Murder Most Intimate (1958; by W. Howard Baker)
  • No Time to Live (1958; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Expresso Jungle (1959; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Passport Into Fear (1959; by W. Howard Baker)
  • The Angry Night (1960; by W. Howard Baker)
  • The Big Smear (1962; by W. Howard Baker)
  • The Reluctant Gunman (1962; by W. Howard Baker)
  • The Impostor(1963; by W. Howard Baker, with Philip Chambers)
  • Treason Remembered (1967; by W. Howard Baker)
  • Epitaph to Treason (1960; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • This Man Must Die! (1960; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Bullets to Baghdad (1960; by Philip Chambers)
  • The Television Murders (1961; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Keep it a Secret (1961; by Philip Chambers)
  • Shot from the Dark (1961; by Philip Chambers)
  • A Corpse for Christmas (1962; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Savage Venture (1962; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Studio One Murder (1962; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • The Last Tiger (1963; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Murder in Camera (1963; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Dangerous Playmate (1962; by Philip Chambers)
  • Moscow Manhunt (1962; by Philip Chambers)
  • The Impostor (1963; by Philip Chambers and W. Howard Baker)
  • Lotus Leaves and Larceny (1963; by Philip Chambers)
  • I, the Hangman (1965; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Murderer at Large (1965; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • The Strange Face of Murder (1965; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • The Witches of Notting Hill (1965; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • A Starlet for a Penny (1966; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Crash and Carry (1967; by Stephen Christie)
  • Down Among the Ad Men (1968; by W. A. Ballinger)
  • Slaughter in the Sun (1969; by Stephen Christie)

ALSO

  • A Clue from the Deep (publication date unknown; by Anonymous)
  • The Clue of the Dead Eyes (publication date unknown; by Anonymous)
  • The Missing Millionaire (publication date unknown; by Anonymous)
  • Witness for the Defence (publication date unknown; by Anonymous)

SHORT STORIES

  • “The Missing Millionaire” (December 20, 1893, The Halfpenny Marvel)
  • “The Man I Killed” (July 8, 1933, Detective Weekly; by Rex Hardinge)
  • “The House of the Hanging Sword” (February 10, 1934, Detective Weekly; by Gwyn Evans)
  • “Under Sexton Blake’s Orders” (1941, Sexton Blake Annual; by John Hunter)
  • “The Green Emerald” (publication date unknown; by Anonymous)
  • “The Curse of Pengarth Castle” (by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • “The House of Light” (by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • “The Pauper of Pengarth Castle” (by Edwy Searles Brooks)
  • “The Affair of the Black Carol” (by Gwyn Evans)
  • “The Crime of the Christmas Tree” (by Gwyn Evans)
  • “Mrs. Bardell’s Christmas Eve” (by Gwyn Evans)
  • “The Mystery of Mrs. Bardell’s Xmas Pudding” (by Gwyn Evans)
  • “The Plague of Onion Men” (by Gwyn Evans)
  • “The Land of Lost Men” (by Rex Hardinge)

NOVELS

  • Sexton Blake and the Demon God (1978; by John Garforth)

COLLECTIONS

  • Sexton Blake (1972; by Anonymous)
  • Crime at Christmas (1974; by Gwyn Evans)
  • Sexton Blake’s Early Cases (1976; by Anonymous)
  • Sexton Blake Wins (1986; by Jack Adrian )
  • The Sexton Blake Casebook (1987; by Anonymous)
  • Sexton Blake and the Great War (2020) Buy this book
    Includes The Case Of The Naval Manoeuvres, On War Service and Private Tinker.
  • Sexton Blake Versus the Master Crooks (2020) Buy this book
    Includes The Case of the Man In Motley, Prince Pretence, and The Wonder Man’s Challenge.

TELEVISION

  • SEXTON BLAKE
    (1968 – 1971)
    30 30-minute episodes
    Starring Laurence Payne as SEXTON BLAKE
    and Roger Foss as Tinker

    • “Return of the Scorpion” (Part One)
    • “Return of the Scorpion” (Part Two)
    • “The Invicta Ray” (Part One)
    • “The Invicta Ray (Part Two)
    • “The Invicta Ray” (Part Three)
    • “The Invicta Ray” (Part Four)
    • “The Great Train Robbery” (Part One)
    • “The Great Train Robbery” (Part Two)
    • “The Great Soccer Mystery” (Part One)
    • “The Great Soccer Mystery” (Part Two)
    • “The Great Soccer Mystery” (Part Three)
    • “Sexton Blake & Captain Nemesis” (Part One)
    • “Sexton Blake & Captain Nemesis” (Part Two)
    • “Sexton Blake & Captain Nemesis” (Part Three)
    • “Sexton Blake Vs The Gangsters” (Part One)
    • “Sexton Blake Vs The Gangsters” (Part Two)
    • “Sexton Blake VS The Gangsters” (Part Three)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Frightened Man (Part One)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Frightened Man” (Part Two)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Undertaker” (Part One)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Undertaker” (Part Two)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Undertaker” (Part Three)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Toy Family” (Part One)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Toy Family” (Part Two)
    • Sexton Blake & the Puff Adder (Part One)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Puff Adder” (Part Two)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Puff Adder” (Part Three)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Puff Adder” (Part Four)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Puff Adder” (Part Five)
    • “Sexton Blake & the Puff Adder” (Part Six)
  • SEXTON BLAKE AND THE DEMON GOD
    (1978, BBC)
    6-part miniseries
    Starring Jeremy Clyde as SEXTON BLAKE
    and Philip Davis as Tinker

COMICS

  • SEXTON BLAKE
    (1939-60)
    Comic strip in The Knockout
  • SEXTON BLAKE
    (1967)
    Short-lived tie-in with the TV series.

RELATED LINKS

Respectfully submitted by Probir. Further bibliographical data provided by Kevin Burton Smith. Thanks to David Liebert for the heads up.

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