Keats, Moses Mosaic, Archie Flock & Caddy Cello (The Navigator Kids)

Created by Christopher Radke (1987--) For those of you who miss The Three Investigators, (with or without Alfred Hitchcock), Christopher Radke may have come up with a thoroughly modern solution: THE NAVIGATOR KIDS, a sly and far grittier update on the kid-run detective agency. Forget the Scooby-style "ghosts," secrets passages, haunted mansions and Jupiter Jones' … Continue reading Keats, Moses Mosaic, Archie Flock & Caddy Cello (The Navigator Kids)

Kat Dylan

Created by Chris Wieland Adding a little much-needed grit and ooomph to the middle grade reading level is KAT DYLAN, a smart, feisty 13-year-old girl detective. Kat and her kid brother Alec are the children of divorced parents (daddy's an LAPD homicide cop, mom's an Army nurse), but when Mom gets deployed, she and her … Continue reading Kat Dylan

The McGurk Organisation

Created by E.W. Hildick (1925–2001) Adult private eye fans have plenty of books to choose from, kids have THE MCGURK ORGANISATION. It's that simple. Their comic adventures appeared in a long-running and popular series of books aimed squarely at 9-12 year olds, from 1973 to 1996, by British author E.W. Hildick. JACK P. McGURK, a ten-year-old … Continue reading The McGurk Organisation

Flatfoot Fox

Created by Clifford Eth Pseudonym of Eth Clifford Rosenberg Illustrated by Brian Lies A series of amusing and entertaining juvenile picture books about FLATFOOT FOX, just about the "the smartest detective in the whole world," who solves woodland cases with the "assistance" of Secretary Bird and plenty of helpful clues, which observant children should have … Continue reading Flatfoot Fox

“Oh mama I got dem cosmic anthropomorphic P.I. blues again…”

Going to the dogs, the cats and worse Yeah, Chandler said "Down these mean streets a man must go." He never mentioned cats. Or hippos. Or horses. Or giraffes...The creators of the following eyes apparently didn't get the memo. But to tell the truth, the craze for anthropomorphic detectives is starting to smell a little … Continue reading “Oh mama I got dem cosmic anthropomorphic P.I. blues again…”

Rider Woofson & The PI Pack

Created by Felix Gumpaw So, does this mean that detective fiction has finally, irretrievably gone completely to the dogs? I mean, a crime solving pooch with his own series, loaded with more doggie puns than a hound dog has fleas? Okay, maybe we should throw creator  a bone. These books are intended, after all, for kids. … Continue reading Rider Woofson & The PI Pack

Jupiter Jones, Bob Andrews & Pete Crenshaw (The Three Investigators)

Created by Robert Arthur, Jr. (1909-1969) “The question mark is the universal symbol of something unknown. We are prepared to solve any puzzle, riddle, mystery, enigma, or conundrum which may be brought to us.” -- Jupiter Jones in The Secret of Terror Castle Purists may snicker, and suggest there's no real reason to include this … Continue reading Jupiter Jones, Bob Andrews & Pete Crenshaw (The Three Investigators)

Nancy Clue, Cherry Aimless & The Hardly Boys

Created by Mabel Maney   I'm not even sure how to fit this series in. The heroes of it are not private eyes. They're not even parodies of private eyes. What they are are shrewd, dead-on lampoons of some of the most popular mystery series ever to be marketed to kids. Except these parodies are … Continue reading Nancy Clue, Cherry Aimless & The Hardly Boys

Feluda (Pradosh Chandra Mitra)

Created by Satyajit Ray (1921-92) PRADOSH CHANDRA MITTER, more commonly known as FELUDA is a thirty-something private eye created by the well known Indian filmmaker, cartoonist, musician and novelist Satyajit Ray. The character made his debut in 1965 in the popular Bengali children’s magazine Sandesh that Ray edited (and which his grandfather had founded), appearing regularly in … Continue reading Feluda (Pradosh Chandra Mitra)

Jim Doyle

Created by -- File this one under "rare." Jim Doyle Private Detective and the Train Hold-Up was published in 1939 as a "penny" book published by Whitman Publishing, out of Racine, Wisconsin, and measured a scant 2 5/8" x 3 5/8." It was had 32 pages, and boasted ten illustrations, and was all held together … Continue reading Jim Doyle